Conjunctions

What  Is a Conjunction?

A conjunction is a word that connects elements of a sentence, such as words, phrases, or clauses.

Type of conjunction

 The three types of conjunctions are:

  • subordinating conjunctions
  • coordinating conjunctions
  • correlative conjunctions.

Subordinate Conjunctions:

Subordinating conjunctions break sentences into word clusters called dependent (or subordinate) clauses. Dependent clauses cannot stand alone and must be connected to an independent clause to make a complex sentence. Subordinating conjunctions connect the dependent clause to the independent clause.

Example: Everyone was happy when it stopped snowing.

Common Subordinating Clauses

After

If only

Unless

Although

In order that

Until

As

Now that

When

As if

Once

Whenever

As long as

Provided

Where

As though

Rather than

Whereas

Because

Since

Wherever

Before

So that

Whether

Even if

That

While

Even though

Though

Within

If

Without

Besides

Example:

  • We can go to the beach when it opens in June.
  • The baby always cries whenever his mother leaves the room.
  • Even if the movies are closed, we could still go to the mall./ We could still go to the mall even if the movies are closed.

Subordinate Conjunctions:

Coordinating conjunctions are single words that connect similar parts of a sentence, such as adjectives, nouns, and clauses. The acronym FANBOYS is often used to refer to coordinating conjunctions. 

                 For             And          Nor        But         Or       Yet        So

Example:

  • I am going on a cruise to Mexico, Jamaica, and Aruba.
  • I really want to go skiing, but there isn’t enough snow on the slopes.
  • Meredith does not want an orange nor a grapefruit.
  • Danny would rather have a chocolate bar or hot cocoa than a granola bar
  • Jenny could not find her notes last night, so she could not study for her test.
  • Her dress was blue and purple.

Correlative Conjunctions:

Correlative conjunctions connect similar parts of a sentence, such as adjectives, nouns, and clauses. However, unlike coordinating conjunctions, correlative conjunctions are combinations of coordinating conjunctions, not only a single word. They always come in pairs and link grammatically equivalent items.

As…as

Both…and

Either…or

Neither…nor

Not only…but also

Not…but

Whether…or

 

 

Example:

  • I like cotton candy as much as I like root beer floats.
  • Both the dog and the cat knocked over the trashcan
  • Nadine wants to go to either Rutgers University or James Madison University
  • Neither Molly nor Emma want to see the new Batman movie.
  • To alleviate stress, you should not only identify the stressors but also find ways of coping with them
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